UONGOZI Institute Leadership Essay Competition 2020 now open

UONGOZI Institute is pleased to announce this year’s Leadership Essay Competition, the eighth since inception (2013). Similar to previous years, this year’s topic aims to solicit thoughts on the theme of the African Leadership Forum (ALF). The essays should respond to the following question:

If you were an African leader, how would you promote African intra-trade to unlock agricultural potential in the Continent?

GUIDELINES

The Competition is open to all African citizens between 18-25 years.

All essays must be typed. The maximum length is two (2) A4 pages. The format shall be of single spaced, Arial font size 11 with page margins of 1 inch (2.54 cm) for each margin, and sent as a Microsoft Word document.

Essays will be judged on the basis of originality, creativity, use of language and appropriateness to contest theme. All essays must be written in English.

PRIZES

A grand prize of USD $2,000 will be awarded to the overall winner.  Up to five winners will be selected.

The winners will receive their awards at a prize-giving event, which will be held online during the seventh ALF. The ceremony will be attended by former African Heads of State and other distinguished leaders from the public sector, private sector, academia and civil society. The overall winner will be asked to read the winning essay at the event.

ELIGIBILITY

Applicants must be African citizens between 18-25 years.

HOW TO APPLY

Essays should be submitted by email to: submissions@uongozi.or.tz

Applicants must also submit a written Statement of Originality and ownership of intellectual property rights.

The final deadline for submission will be Friday, 10 July, 2020 at 17:00 hours (EAT). The winners will be notified via email in August, 2020. Feedback will not be provided on individual essays.

ABOUT THE COMPETITION

The Leadership Essay Competition is organised annually by UONGOZI Institute to provide a space for the youth of Africa and the next generation of leaders in the region to contribute to important discussions on leadership and sustainable development. Since 2013, seven Competitions have been organised.

TIPS FOR WINNING THE COMPETITION

Need advice on how to write a winning essay? Follow these tips from some of the previous overall winners: Liz Guantai (2016), Victor Azure (2017), Victor Ndede (2018), Panashe Gombiro (2019).

USEFUL LINKS

Applications Invited for the Post of Senior Research Associate – Leadership

UONGOZI Institute is implementing its strategic plan 2016/17 – 2020/21 within which “advancing knowledge and practice of good leadership” is one of its goals. The purpose of this goal is to generate and disseminate new knowledge on leadership. With this, the institute believes it will inspire and engage the research and academic community, think tanks, leaders, and the wider public and hence contribute to advancing the practice of good leadership.

While leadership is important everywhere in the world, the way that it is practiced differs by region and by context. Many studies have examined the practice of leadership in western cultures, but leadership in most of Africa has not been explored in much depth, and there are so many impressionistic assertions about leadership in the continent.

The Institute is seeking to appoint a Senior Research Associate to provide intellectual guidance to its Research Programme on Leadership in Africa. The three-year Programme aims to explore and understand the many dimensions of leadership development and practice in postcolonial Africa. The Programme will contribute towards building a body of knowledge on leadership development and practice in Africa; leadership related policy-discussions across the continent; the design of leadership development initiatives; and strengthened research networks in the area of leadership.

Duties and Responsibilities

The main duties of the post are:

  1. To contribute to the development of the Research Programme on Leadership in Africa;
  2. To contribute to preparing proposals and other activities to secure funding;
  3. To undertake research that contributes to the programme outputs and outcomes;
  4. To contribute towards capacity building of researchers at the Institute;
  5. To participate and present work at seminars, workshops and conferences; and
  6. To participate in round-tables or events open to policy-makers;

Other duties may be assigned from time to time by the Executive Director.

Modality of Engagement

This role is a part-time position and its award is not a contract of employment. The successful applicant can be engaged as a resident or non-resident fellow and for the latter, flexible working arrangements may be negotiated. For resident fellows, it will be the responsibility of UONGOZI Institute to arrange for travel, accommodation, transport, office space and make any other living arrangements for the duration of their stay (a maximum of one year).

Qualifications

The successful applicant will hold a Research Degree (Master’s based on research, MPhil) or PhD. S/he will be a scholar with advanced knowledge of at least 10 years on the subject of leadership. The Programme requires considerable organizational and intellectual skills including a practical understanding of spoken and written English language. It is expected that the successful candidate will already have held a postdoctoral fellowship or the equivalent.

Application Process

Interested candidates should forward a CV with a cover letter to research@uongozi.or.tz

The closing date for completed applications is 28th February, 2017

Inquiries

For further inquiries use the contact information provided below:

UONGOZI Institute

Plot No. 62, Msasani Road, Oysterbay

P.O. Box 105753, Dar es Salaam

Phone: (22) 260 2917   Fax: (22) 260 2918

Email: research@uongozi.or.tz

UONGOZI Institute exists to support African leaders to attain sustainable development for their nation and for Africa.  We seek to inspire leaders and promote the recognition of the important role of leadership in sustainable development through research, capacity development and public dialogues.

 www.uongozi.or.tz

Industrial Development in Tanzania: renewed commitment amidst persistent challenges

by Dennis Rweyemamu pic+industrial

The fifth phase Government of the United Republic of Tanzania has demonstrated renewed commitment to industrialization, as part of a broader agenda to create employment opportunities and substantially reduce poverty. This renewed commitment to promoting industrial development is timely. Literature suggests that economic development requires structural change from low to high-productivity activities, and that the industrial sector is a key engine of growth in the development process. Virtually all country cases of high, rapid and sustained economic growth have been associated with industrialization, particularly growth in manufacturing production.

Unfortunatley, the manufacturing sector in Tanzania is an example of disappointing sectoral performance. In the past, policy failures both in design and implementation have contributed to poor industrial performance. During the import-substitution phase of the 1970s, government policies and efforts focused more on providing support to domestic firms than on getting them to perform. Furthermore, the emphasis was on setting up industries rather than on building dynamic capabilities that would allow firms to be competitive. High protection meant that domestic firms were poorly prepared for international competition. The fact that the state created and operated the manufacturing firms simply made the problem worse. Investments were often made with little regard to efficiency, and the managerial capacity of the state was badly overstretched.

The structural adjustment phase of the 1980s and 1990s, saw the withdrawal of government support, even in the presence of market failures, and the liberalization of trade without taking account of the capabilities of domestic firms is another example of policy failure. Emerging from being the worst affected during the economic crises of the early 1980s, (despite massive public investments), the sector has never really recovered. The main reforms in the sector evolved around restructuring activities and liberalizing the investment climate. While there were mild achievements in a few industries, the rest were either stagnant or worse off. With the ushering of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) in the early 2000s, resources were shifted away from the productive sectors that are necessary for sustained growth and poverty reduction, with a new focus on the social sectors.

Although policy failures did contribute to poor industrial performance, structural factors also played a role. The structural factors are manifest in the form of poor infrastructure (including roads, airways, railways, and communication), low human capital, small size of domestic markets, and a low entrepreneurial base. No industry can run smoothly in an environment where the whole range of basic infrastructure leaves a lot to be desired. Fortunately, we are now seeing efforts by the Government to address infrastructural constraints, but these efforts need to be intensified.

The small size of domestic markets in Tanzania implies that we are unlikely to sustain an industrialization agenda without access to regional and global markets. These external markets would provide an opportunity to expand production as well as exports, and reap the benefits of scale economies. It would also make available the much needed foreign exchange to import intermediate inputs and capital goods for domestic industries.

But are we competitive enough to enter into these markets? It is important that industrial development efforts be part of an overall process of integration into the global economy rather than inward-looking as was the case during the import-substitution phase. Imposing import bans on goods will only help firms targeting the domestic market, and in a way be a “cost” to consumers who would have otherwise accessed cheaper imports of the same or even higher quality. There should be efforts towards building the capabilities of domestic firms and preparing them to compete in export markets for medium and high-technology manufactured goods.

While the Goverment has recognized the necessity to promote industrial and manufacturing development in order to address the country’s development challenges, there is need to search for an approach that is strategic, integrates lessons from the past, and takes into account the realities of a changing global environment. Investment in human capital should be key to any such strategy so as to improve efficiency and thus productivity levels. This, however, must be supported by necessary public goods (particularly investments in infrastructure), support institutions (for trade facilitation, credit, access to technology, establishment of standards and certification) and an incentive structure that is conducive to industrial growth.

So, in the fierce competition of export markets, does Tanzania stand a chance? Yes, it does. Not that it will be easy or quick, but with better policies and more investment, we could be competitive in things like agro-products, footwear, furniture and other low-skill industries. Opportunities are there, but we need to strategize and implement plans. Otherwise we may remain stuck in only exporting natural resources.

Is there a right formula for managing the oil and gas sector in Tanzania?

ngt

by Namwaka Omari

Discussion and debates around natural resources in Tanzania have in recent years focused on the projected revenues from the gas sector. The new discoveries of natural gas have shifted the nation’s conversation to turn to look at what this gas can do for the country. The underlying assumption here is that if the gas is developed, processed, piped and exported, it will bring in significant cash flow to the government; a new cash cow of sort. This is all well and good – in theory. In practice, the process is not all that simple and if not managed ‘right’, then we may not realise the projected revenues that are meant to come from the gas reserves. How then do we properly manage the sector? What should we put in place? What should we do first? What should we NOT do?

These are all important questions that we should be asking ourselves and thinking critically as to how to position ourselves to truly benefit from our natural resources. They cannot all be answered at one go, nor should they be attempted to be answered at one go as this is a complex sector that needs careful analysis. What we should do is learn from others that have gone before us on this journey, and determine which lessons we can take forward and which we should leave behind. Not all will work for us as Tanzania, but there may be some experiences that we can take from and build on – some good foundations.

An example of this is from a recent trip to Ghana, which revealed that their natural resources are protected in the mother law – the Constitution – with powers vested in the parliament to look at each and every contract that is in the realm of natural resources prior to approval. This oversight role is important in ensuring that each contract attains maximum benefit for citizens. This is indeed an important lesson for us in Tanzania, where does the buck stop with us?

What I am offering here is one foundation, which borrows from the Natural Resource Charter framework. I am offering a few of the ingredients in the recipe of how we can start to possibly think about ‘getting it right’:

Ingredient 1: Have in place a comprehensive national strategy or ‘vision’ for the sector with an effective coordination framework; this means developing a shared blueprint (vision) and creating an “authorizing environment” for the natural gas sector which spans all the relevant ministries and is housed at a high office.

Ingredient 2: Ensure Government ownership of geological information so that the Government knows how much is available and where, this will provide ownership of the data to the Government.

Ingredient 3: Empower citizens with correct information which speaks to the need to have a critical mass of informed citizens which can hold the Government accountable.

Ingredient 4: Secure efficient allocation of licenses to ensure maximum benefits by having a transparent licensing regime.

Ingredient 5: Realise the full value from the natural resources by vesting ownership to the Government through empowering the National Oil Company as a commercial entity, as well as ensuring that tax regimes enable the government to realize the value of resources.

Ingredient 6: Put in place an effective regulatory framework by establishing a regulatory authority and frameworks for upstream, as well as effective institutions and frameworks for midstream and downstream.

Ingredient 7: Make sure environmental and social costs of oil & gas projects are accounted for, mitigated and offset, which will mean enhancing monitoring of company operations, enforcement of compliance to laws that safeguard surrounding communities from harmful environmental impacts, as well as putting in place an effective system to respond to environmental disasters (such as oil spills or hazardous leaks).

Ingredient 8: Invest oil & gas revenues to achieve optimal and equitable outcomes for both current and future generations. Here we could learn from others and establish a Gas Revenue Fund which is independent, with the purpose of ring-fencing funding for continuous development of the oil & gas industry, ensuring financing of strategic infrastructure, managing fiscal volatility as well as saving for the future generations.

[Watch the In Focus show on understanding Sovereign Wealth Funds here]

Ingredient 9: Design integration of the oil and gas sector for economic transformation, by harnessing oil and gas to transform other critical sectors such as infrastructure as well as ensuring local content (employment, local supply chain,s etc.) and local skills are developed.

Ingredient 10: Dialogue with International Oil Companies (IOCs), to ensure they are committed to contributing to sustainable development through their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in line with local development plans, as well as adhering to national standards.

Ingredient 11: Engage the International Community to support the sustainable development efforts of the country, by encouraging IOCs to operate in the same way as they operate in their countries of origin. Information sharing initiatives should be enhanced, while ensuring that the host country proactively engages with the IOCs.

This does not suggest that these ingredients are a magic pill; nor that they will guarantee ‘getting it right’, but it is a start. There is no one ‘right’ formula – no one size fits all in managing the sector, however, there are ingredients which are essential, and looking at what other countries have done, which give us a starting point, may put us on a path that could potentially work for Tanzania.

Other resources on managing natural resources:

Events in Pictures: Finnish Journalists Visit UONGOZI Institute

Chief Executive Officer of UONGOZI Institute, Professor Joseph Semboja (second from left) speaking to a delegation of journalists from Finland when they visited the Institute on Friday, 18 March, 2016. From left is the Head of Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Finland, Ms. Milma Kuttenen, Ms. Liisa Tervo, Partnership Advisor at UONGOZI Institute, and Mr. Dennis Rweyemamu, Head of Research and Policy at UONGOZI Institute.
Chief Executive Officer of UONGOZI Institute, Professor Joseph Semboja (second from left) speaking to a delegation of journalists from Finland when they visited the Institute on Friday, 18 March, 2016. From left is the Head of Development Cooperation at the Embassy of Finland, Ms. Milma Kuttenen, Ms. Liisa Tervo, Partnership Advisor at UONGOZI Institute, and Mr. Dennis Rweyemamu, Head of Research and Policy at UONGOZI Institute.

 

Delegation of 15 journalists from Finland who visited UONGOZI Institute as a part of a 5-day program  organized by the Finish Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
Delegation of 15 journalists from Finland who visited UONGOZI Institute as a part of a 5-day program organized by the Finish Ministry of Foreign Affairs, joined by officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Finland.

 

Natural Resource Management Programme Coordinator, Ms. Namwaka Omari (standing) delivering a presentation to journalists on UONGOZI Institute’s work on supporting the management of natural resources in tanzania, with an emphasis on the oil and gas sector.
Natural Resource Management Programme Coordinator, Ms. Namwaka Omari (standing) delivering a presentation to journalists on UONGOZI Institute’s work on supporting the management of natural resources in Tanzania, with an emphasis on the oil and gas sector.

 

One of the journalists from the Finnish delegation posing a question. Some of the issues that were discussed on the day included Tanzania’s work so far on sustainable development, capacity building for leaders in Africa, and the current state of Tanzania’s oil and gas sector.
One of the journalists from the Finnish delegation posing a question. Some of the issues that were discussed on the day included Tanzania’s work so far on sustainable development, capacity building for leaders in Africa, and the current state of Tanzania’s oil and gas sector.

 

Ms. Milma Kuttenen, Head of Development Cooperation from the Embassy of Finland thanking UONGOZI Institute on behalf of the delegation of journalists and officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Finland for hosting the visit.
Ms. Milma Kuttenen, Head of Development Cooperation from the Embassy of Finland thanking UONGOZI Institute on behalf of the delegation of journalists and officials from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Finland for hosting the visit.

Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Series: Goal 9

Goal 9

Goal Nine: Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation

SDG Nine focuses on the physical elements that surround the global population, which are integral in achieving sustainable development, but can be forgotten when weighed against issues such as healthcare and poverty. This goal emphasizes not only the most commonly thought of forms of infrastructure, such as roads and railways, but also the more modern versions such as internet access. Africa currently has approximately 330 million internet users with a 29% penetration rate on the continent and the numbers are growing. Still, this is relatively low in comparison to the rest of the world, with penetration rates of 40% in Asia, 73% in Europe, 52% in the Middle East and 55% in Latin America, for example. The upward progress, however, is a good sign for achieving the target of universal access.

This goal also emphasizes the need to increase industrialization, especially in developing country contexts. This is particularly relevant for Africa, with most countries in sub-Saharan Africa’s manufacturing share of output having fallen during the past 25 years. Some countries are already making significant progress, however, with Ethiopia’s manufacturing having grown at a rate of approximately 10% per year from 2006-2014, for example. Tanzania has also experienced growth in manufacturing output at 7.5% per year from 2007-2012.

Proposed Targets:

9.1 Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all

9.2 Promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and, by 2030, significantly raise industry’s share of employment and gross domestic product, in line with national circumstances, and double its share in least developed countries

9.3 Increase the access of small-scale industrial and other enterprises, in particular in developing countries, to financial services, including affordable credit, and their integration into value chains and markets

9.4 By 2030, upgrade infrastructure and retrofit industries to make them sustainable, with increased resource-use efficiency and greater adoption of clean and environmentally sound technologies and industrial processes, with all countries taking action in accordance with their respective capabilities

9.5 Enhance scientific research, upgrade the technological capabilities of industrial sectors in all countries, in particular developing countries, including, by 2030, encouraging innovation and substantially increasing the number of research and development workers per 1 million people and public and private research and development spending

9.a Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States

9.b Support domestic technology development, research and innovation in d4eveloping countries, including by ensuring a conducive policy environment for, inter alia, industrial diversification and value addition to commodities

9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020

Related Content

Article: The Economist – More a marathon than a sprint

Report: UNECA – Industrialising through trade

Video: UONGOZI Institute – Knowledge and Innovation for Africa’s Transformation

 

What is the UONGOZI Institute Blog?

Welcome to UONGOZI Institute’s blog, and as we say it here in Tanzania – Karibuni.

This blog will serve as an informal platform for the UONGOZI Institute (UI) to provide useful information, as well as encourage an exchange of ideas for those across the continent and beyond who are interested in issues of leadership and sustainable development in Africa.

Posts will cover a variety of topics surrounding those two themes, including useful information from UI’s research findings and television shows, and provide insights on capacity building through tips and tricks from UI’s training courses. There will also be periodic posts to announce UI events and relevant scholarships and fellowships advertised outside of UI, or other programs that could prove to be useful for the emerging generation of African leaders.

Lastly, reviews of books on topics of interest from the UONGOZI Institute Resource Center will be posted by UI staff to help provide recommendations for those interested in delving deeper into the material presented here. We also welcome guest posts from practitioners in fields related to any of the above mentioned topics.

If you are interested in contributing as a guest blogger, please email info@uongozi.or.tz with “Guest Blog Post” as the subject line.

From those of us here at the UONGOZI Institute Blog, we hope to see you here weekly to join the dialogue on these important thematic issues. To make sure you are always aware of when a new post is freshly pressed, you can follow our blog by pressing the “Follow” button on the right hand side of the page.


Please see our “About” page to learn more about the UONGOZI Institute and be sure to visit our website.